Tropical Seed Saving African Hybrid Okra Demonstration

17 replies, 2 voices Last updated by  Glendon Hamner 2 weeks, 6 days ago
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  • #4882

    K. Afrane Okese
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    @kafraneokese

    The Africa Hybrid Okra has been improved by open pollination by @glen from Panama.

    In this demonstration, we will try to capture all the characteristics and adaptability of this variety whiles comparing with the already existing varieties.

  • #4885

    K. Afrane Okese
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    @kafraneokese

    The site was sprayed with weedicide. Seeds were sowed in the dying weeds. No-till as usual. The weeds will die and go down and give way to the okra to come up.

    The seeds were sowed, 2seeds per hill at a spacing 1m x 1m on 17th April 2018.

  • #4888

    K. Afrane Okese
    Keymaster
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    @kafraneokese

    7days after planting. 45 out of the 70 hills sowed.  Insects attacking very early. We applied insecticide to prevent further attack.

  • #4891

    Glendon Hamner
    Participant
    • Topics - 1
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    @glen

    I am very pleased and thankful to see this trial in progress.  Please enclose foto’s so we can see how this trial unfolds.

    • #4903

      K. Afrane Okese
      Keymaster
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      @kafraneokese

      Sure, Glen.

      We will be telling all the story about this okra with many more pictures as we go on.

  • #4892

    Glendon Hamner
    Participant
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    @glen

    Oh, I wanted to try and identify this new variety of okra.  It is a hybrid backcross between Abelmoschus Esculentus and Abelmoschus Caillie.  It is also an open-pollenated new species of okra.  It is very exciting for me to see this new hybrid being trialed by Afrane, in Ghana.  Lets see what happens!

  • #4907

    K. Afrane Okese
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    @kafraneokese

    14days after planting. We replaced seeds that did not germinate and those that were lost to insect attack at that young age. So we then we had 57 out of 70 stands after the replaced seeds had germinated.

  • #4909

    K. Afrane Okese
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    @kafraneokese

    21days after planting. It is said that this okra is very delicate during the first month.

  • #4912

    K. Afrane Okese
    Keymaster
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    @kafraneokese

    30days old okra. The field is coming up pretty well. The plants are gradually passing the delicate stage. We had to apply an insecticide for the second time to stop insect attack.

  • #4926

    Glendon Hamner
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    @glen

    Afrane, the juvenile specimans look great.  Soon, if you have not done so you will need to thin out each hill or stand to one plant per stand.  I am sure you have already applied fertilizer or aged manure.  If not, this would help.  I use pelletized fertilizer in a form that is of good quality.  A tablespoon or so, broadcasted around each plant would be fine the first time.  Then, as the plants get larger, increase the amount some.  About every 10 to 14 days.  You will get the feel of it by doing this.  Once the plants are putting on pods you want to pull back on the fertilizer by applying much less frequently.  Your juvenile plants should be starting to branch.  Each leaf node should be throwing off the beginning of a branch.  This is branchy okra.  It will grow nice thick branches.

    • #4929

      K. Afrane Okese
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      @kafraneokese

      Well noted, Glen

  • #4935

    K. Afrane Okese
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    @kafraneokese

    Day 36

    NPK 15:15:15 applied. Flea beetles identified to be feeding on the leaves of the Okra. Contact insecticide applied at 2weeks interval. It is becoming necessary to reduce interval of application to a week.

    Observation: At this stage when we had to get beneath the plants and remove the weeds around the plants we experienced itching from spines on the leaves.

  • #4974

    K. Afrane Okese
    Keymaster
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    @kafraneokese

    Day 40

    A sudden turn of events after the application of pesticide and fertilizer. The young okra plants are burnt, supposedly by the over-application of the fertilizer.

    Glen (@glen) advises we apply just a tablespoonful of fertilizer at a time and the at a wider radius. The fertilizer is supposed to be spread around the crop and not heaped at one spot.

    The next step is to replant all lost stands of okra.

    Lessons learnt.

  • #4979

    Glendon Hamner
    Participant
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    @glen

    The first lesson you must take out of this is that everyone makes mistakes when gardening.  I have gardened all my life and I still make mistakes.  Its what you do with the information that is important.  We must pay attention to details at all time when applying fertilizing or applying farm products to our crops.  Even so, I still sometimes over-apply a product and do damage when my intention was to help the plants grow well.  So, do not be hard on your self.  You should return to the grow site and see if there are any survivors.  I would also rethink the grid pattern you are using.   One meter between plants is good.  Widen the space up between rows.  I suggest 2 meters between rows.  You will need space later to enter the stand to harvest the okra.   The no till method should work fine.  Maybe some of the existing plants can be saved!   That would be good news!

    • #4990

      K. Afrane Okese
      Keymaster
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      @kafraneokese

      Thanks, Glen.

      We have replanted the almost the whole field on Sunday, 27th May. We are expecting germination from tomorrow. That mistake will be well taken care of.

      The okra adventure is still exciting.

      Looking forward to welcoming the new ones on the fields.

  • #4984

    Glendon Hamner
    Participant
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    @glen

    These are today’s foto’s of part of my current planting of Hybrid African okra.  These plants are growing in the Republic of Panama in Central America.  My climate is pretty much identical to your climate there in Ghana.  I am growing my specimans in 10 gallon pots using amended soil.  I added compost to the soil.   Seeds were planted on April 15th so the plants are now 45 days old.  You can see the pod heads forming.  You can also see branches forming at all the leaf nodes.  I also had a set-back.  I over applied calcium to the soil before sewing the seeds.  This slightly burned some of the seedlings and did indeed killed some of my seedlings.  I had to replant part of my garden with new seed.  These current plants were fertilized with one tablespoon of quality fertilizer several weeks ago.  I have been getting adequate rain every other day or so.  Temps here in Panama are very warm.

    • #4991

      K. Afrane Okese
      Keymaster
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      @kafraneokese

      Nice.

      Your okra plants obviously are having a good time. We shall follow suit.

  • #4995

    Glendon Hamner
    Participant
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    @glen

    I can’t wait to see the new seedlings when they come up.  I feel badly that you had the misfortune for the first try.  I am sure you will do well the second time around.  Last year, I had a bad experience as well.  I planted all my okra.  The seedlings came up and were infected with leaf-curl virus.  I didn’t know what it was at first so I let the plants continue to grow because you know, sometimes seedlings can grow out of a problem.  Well, the problem did not get better.  Leaf curl virus is one of several different virus that can infect our okra.  It is brought by the white fly.  The leaves on the seedlings get curled up and mal-formed.  I let the plants grow for 30 days before finally pulling them all up.  I replanted new seeds.  Right in the same pots I was using.  I don’t know why, but the new seedlings did not get infected with leaf curl virus.  Very lucky.  I lost a month but it could have been worse.  My new seedlings could have been infected again.  But, for whatever reason, they were not.  I had a very good season after that.  This year, I have not seen white fly or virus of any kind.  I have seen wilt desease though, that infects peppers and tomato’s.  It has not bothered the okra yet.

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